BRCA2 gene implicated in rare but lethal prostate cancer

Findings published in renowned journal Nature Communications



January 9, 2017 – TORONTO, ON – Canadian scientists have discovered a link between an inherited mutation in the BRCA2 gene and a deadly form of prostate cancer. Funded by Prostate Cancer Canada and led by Dr. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, the findings were published today in Nature Communications: 


Dr. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto discusses the newly
published BRCA2 paper in Nature Communications

Known more commonly for its role in breast and ovarian cancers, healthy BRCA2 genes protect against tumours by producing proteins that help repair damaged genes. Mutations in these genes, however, can result in gene damage that does not get repaired properly and leads to aggressive cancers.

“Thanks to the commitment and generosity of our loyal Canadian donors, we are continually striving towards a world in which we will be able to personalize care for all men diagnosed with the most common cancer in men,” explained Dr. Stuart Edmonds, Vice President of Research, Health Promotion and Survivorship at Prostate Cancer Canada. “The BRCA2 project is an example of yet another significant development to that end.”

Full Article: http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13671
Related Study: Genetic Association with Aggressive Prostate Cancer Discovered

-30-
 
For more information please contact:
Adam Miller
Manager, Communications
Prostate Cancer Canada
416 441 2131 ext. 235
adam.miller@prostatecancer.ca



Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter!

* indicates required

 



PCC Spotlight
Rocco Rossi to wrap up successful 5-year tenure as Prostate Cancer Canada CEO

September 7, 2017 - TORONTO, ON - With mixed emotions, longstanding Prostate Cancer Canada (PCC) President and CEO, Rocco Rossi, formally announced today that his time leading the organization will officially come to a close as of December 31, 2017.
More

Mutation in prostate tumours shown to change epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNA

(TORONTO, Canada - Aug 7, 2017) -- Prostate cancer researchers have mapped the impact of an acquired mutation that alters epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNA, in about 50% of patient tumour samples.
More

Movember Foundation and Prostate Cancer Canada team up to turn research into results

July 26, 2017 - TORONTO, ON - Continuing their longstanding tradition of partnering to fund high quality Canadian prostate cancer research, Prostate Cancer Canada (PCC) and The Movember Foundation today announced two new projects with very real potential to make a tangible difference in the lives of men living with aggressive forms of prostate cancer.
More


Click here for news archive