Risk Factors

There is no single cause of prostate cancer. However, some factors make developing prostate cancer more likely. 

Age: The chance of getting prostate cancer rises quickly after a man reaches age 50. Age is the most important risk factor for prostate cancer.

Race: Prostate cancer is more common in men of African or Caribbean descent and less common in men of Asian descent.

Family history: Genetics plays a role - the risk of prostate cancer increases if close family members have had the disease.

Diet: Men who eat a low-fibre, high-fat diet have a higher rate of prostate cancer. Research suggests that saturated fat (commonly found in processed foods, whole-milk dairy products and fatty cuts of meat) increases the production of the hormone testosterone, which may help prostate cancer cells grow. 

Lifestyle: Having a high Body Mass Index (BMI) may increase the risk of prostate cancer. Being physically active is a good preventative tactic, along with losing weight and eating the right foods. Consuming lycopene (found in tomatoes and tomato products), soy, green tea and cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli), among other foods and nutrients, may help to prevent prostate cancer.

It is possible to develop prostate cancer even when none of these risk factors is present.

Photo by Dave Chidley ©, PhotoSensitive
   

 
Are You at Risk of Developing Prostate Cancer?

Not all men have the same risk of developing prostate cancer—do you have any idea where you fall on the spectrum? Risk factors fall into two broad categories: modifiable and non-modifiable. It’s important to take stock of both.

[Read More]

 

 

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