Chemotherapy Drugs

Chemotherapy drugs belong to the class of drugs known as antineoplastic agents. Antineoplastic agents work by damaging cancer cells due to their high toxicity.

Everyone responds to chemotherapy treatments differently. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about what to expect before, during and after chemotherapy, including any side-effects you may experience. Some therapies used to treat prostate cancer may interact with other prescription or non-prescription medications you are taking. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any medications.

Below are common chemotherapy drugs used to treat prostate cancer. Click on each drug name for further information including:
  • what the drug is and how it works
  • how the drug is administered
  • possible side effects of the drug
  • whether the drug is covered by your provincial drug program
Cabazataxel (Jevtana®)

Docetaxel (Taxotere®)

Mitoxantrone (Teva®) 
Last Reviewed: July 2017




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