Mitoxantrone (Teva®)

Common name: Mitoxantrone
Brand name: Teva®
 

What is Mitoxantrone?

Mitoxantrone is a chemotherapy drug used to treat advanced prostate cancer by interfering with the growth and reproduction of cancer cells. This therapy is used in combination with corticosteroids, such as prednisone or prednisolone.


How is Mitoxantrone administered?

Mitoxantrone is administered by injection.
 

What are possible side effects of this treatment?

Everyone responds differently to chemotherapy – some experience many side effects while others experience very few. Below are some side effects experienced by those who received mitoxantrone. Tell your health care team about side-effects you are experiencing so they know how best to help you manage them.

 
•    Bleeding / bruising
•    Diarrhea
•    Fatigue
•    Hair loss
•    Infection
•    Liver problems
•    Mouth sores
•    Nausea / vomiting
•    Pain, burning, redness, swelling at injection site
 
 

Is Mitoxantrone covered in my province or territory?

Provincial Coverage: Unknown    
    
Last Reviewed: July 2017

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