Publications by PCC-funded Researchers

Supported by Prostate Cancer Canada and the Movember Foundation, a research team at the Vancouver Prostate Centre led by Drs. Alex Wyatt and Kim Chi shed light on how men with metastatic prostate cancer who will not respond well to hormone therapy can be identified early using a blood test and prioritized for a different course of treatment. Their work was published in the journal of European Urology.


 


The Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) has published findings from the world’s most comprehensive genetic analysis of prostate cancer tumours in the journal Nature. Led by Drs. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Paul Boutros of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, CPC-GENE has uncovered the full set of mutations that can occur in the most common cancer in men. By fully cataloging these mutations, the CPC-GENE team was able to create a new signature that predicts at an early stage whether a prostate cancer tumour will become aggressive or not, allowing for personalized treatment.

Read the full story here



 


Canadian scientists have discovered a link between an inherited mutation in the BRCA2 gene and a deadly form of prostate cancer. Funded by Prostate Cancer Canada and led by Dr. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, the findings were published in Nature Communications.

Read the full story here

 


 

For more information please contact:

Arden Bagni
Manager, Communications
Prostate Cancer Canada
416 441 2131 ext. 264
arden.bagni@prostatecancer.ca

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PCC Spotlight
Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
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The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
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Landmark study links tumour evolution to prostate cancer severity

Toronto (April 19, 2018) – Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumour has evolved.
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