Alberta


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PCCN PROSTAID Calgary
Contact: Stewart Campbell
Phone: 403 455-1916
Email:executive.director@pccncalgary.org
Website:http://www.pccncalgary.org/
Meet At:
2nd Tuesday of the month
Kerby Centre, 1133 7th Ave Sw
6:30PM for focus groups

7:30PM for general meeting

PCCN EDMONTON
Contact: Arni Goodman
P: 780 437-4602
E: 
arni.goodman@shaw.ca
www.edmontonprostatepeers.ca
Meet: 2nd Tuesday
Shaw 31 Auditorium, Level O of the Mazankowski Heart Institute, U of A Hospital
7:30 PM 
Parking Information: Use East Parking Lot (at 83rd Ave NW & 112 St. NW) 
Free Exit Pass Available at Meeting


LETHBRIDGE PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP
Contact: Roy Blais
P: 403 327-5452
F: 403 327-5883
Meet: 2nd Thursday
CCS Office 

PCCN MEDICINE HAT
Contact: Jack Knowles 
P:403-526-2108
E: knowsecx@memlane.com

Meet: Call for times
554 Cambridge St. E

PCCN CENTRAL ALBERTA
Contact: Bert Lougheed
P: 403 343-3808
E: 
skyhawk@telusplanet.net
Meet: 3rd Thursday
Gaetz Memorial United Church, Red Deer 
7:30 PM 

 



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PCC Spotlight
Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
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The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
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Landmark study links tumour evolution to prostate cancer severity

Toronto (April 19, 2018) – Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumour has evolved.
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